L W EE R6

Provide word banks, notebooks, clipboards, post-its and other writing resources for both indoor and outdoor play. Ensure resources enable children to draw on their out-of-school practices and personal interests, such as children’s popular culture or sports teams. Include oral stories and explore ways for both adults and children to develop oral storytelling skills. Provide aContinue reading “L W EE R6”

L W EE R5

Write down things children say to support their developing understanding that what they say can be written down, and then read and understood by someone else. Encourage parents to do this as well. Set up environments of offices, dens in the garden, library, shop, home corner with greetings cards, etc., so that children engage inContinue reading “L W EE R5”

L W EE R4

Draw attention to marks, signs and symbols in the environment and talk about what they represent. Ensure this involves recognition of English, other languages and scripts. Provide materials which reflect cultural diversity, so children see symbols and marks with which they are familiar, and learn that there are many different script systems e.g. Arabic, Chinese,Continue reading “L W EE R4”

L W EE R3

Introduce a range of appropriate implements including large brushes, chalk and crayons, sticks and sponges for children to trace patterns and shapes. Offer children a range of different surfaces to make marks on, inside and out, e.g. chalkboards, light boxes, sand and pathways. Provide a broad range of opportunities for early writing experiences through sensoryContinue reading “L W EE R3”

L W EE R1 R2

Provide a range of materials: sand, paint, early writing apps etc. for babies and toddlers to make marks with their hands and fingers, feet and bodies. Give children large sheets of paper, trays of gloop, paint, soil etc. to make marks collaboratively.

L W PR R6

Find out about, show interest in and legitimise children’s out-of-school writing practices and interests. Remember that not all writing formats go from left to right. Talk to children about things they might write to support their play inside and outside, e.g. they might make a map for a journey, a job list for a builder,Continue reading “L W PR R6”

L W PR R5

Notice and encourage children’s drawing, painting and early writing and the meanings that they give to them, such as when a child covers a whole piece of paper and says, “I’m writing”. Celebrate and value children’s early attempts at graphic representation – focusing on the meaning and content rather than letter formation. Model and includeContinue reading “L W PR R5”

L W PR R4

Listen and support what children tell you about their drawings and early writing. Write down (scribe) the words that children use and display these words, for example, with photos Co-create stories orally with individual children and in small groups. Scribe the stories and display them for children to look at independently or with a parentContinue reading “L W PR R4”

L W PR R3

Encourage different mark-making movements – big, small, hard, soft, quick and slow, and different shapes, circles, lines and dots. Tell children about the marks you are making and encourage them to talk to you about theirs. Value these early mark making activities by sharing them with others including parents and carers. Write down (scribe) children’sContinue reading “L W PR R3”

L W PR R1 R2

Encourage children to use their fingers and implements to explore and trace marks on a surface, e.g. using a spoon in their food, or a finger in the sand. Make marks together with babies and toddlers using a range of appropriate materials and tools.

L W UC R6

Enjoys creating texts to communicate meaning for an increasingly wide range of  purposes, such as making greetings cards, tickets, lists, invitations and creating their own stories and books with images and sometimes with words, in print and digital formats Gives meaning to the marks they make as they draw, write, paint and type using aContinue reading “L W UC R6”

L W UC R5

Makes up stories, play scenarios, and drawings in response to experiences, such as  outings Sometimes gives meaning to their drawings and paintings Ascribes meanings to signs, symbols and words that they see in different places, including those they make themselves Includes mark making and early writing in their play Imitates adults’ writing by making continuousContinue reading “L W UC R5”

L W UC R4

Distinguishes between the different marks they make Enjoys drawing and writing on paper, on screen and on different textures, such as in sand or playdough and through using touch-screen technology.

L W UC R3

As toddlers develop, they increase their understanding of how their marks are symbolic and convey meaning. Their marks may not yet resemble letters and words but nonetheless may carry meaning for the child.  Begins to understand the cause and effect of their actions in mark making Knows that the marks they make are of valueContinue reading “L W UC R3”

L W UC R1 R2

Writing systems are complicated ways to symbolise meaning, and children need to learn many skills and develop a lot of knowledge as they begin to write.  Writing skills and understanding start to develop in babies and toddlers.   Firstly, children begin to understand that written texts are symbolic and carry meaning. Later they begin to produceContinue reading “L W UC R1 R2”

L R EE R6

Provide a rich range of quality children’s literature and dialogic shared reading experiences to involve children in critical engagement with narratives, characters and plots. Provide a range of everyday signs and written texts in play areas (labels, lists, recipes, instructions, etc.) so children can include these in their play. Make story books with children inContinue reading “L R EE R6”

L R EE R5

Provide some simple poetry, song, fiction and non-fiction books, both paper copies and digital. Provide fact and fiction books and possibly ebooks that children can access independently in all areas, e.g. construction area as well as the book area. Provide books containing photographs that children can share with adults, peers and read on their own.Continue reading “L R EE R5”

L R EE R4

Find quality time every day to tell and read stories to children, using puppets, soft toys, or real objects as props. Provide stories, pictures and puppets which allow children to experience and talk about how characters feel. Include familiar environmental print in the role play area. Create frequent opportunities for singing, rhymes and music sessions.Continue reading “L R EE R4”

L R EE R3

Provide digital recordings  of rhymes, stories, sounds and spoken words. Provide picture books, books with flaps or hidden words, and books with accompanying story apps. Provide story sacks for children to take home, for parents to read books with their children and talk about stories. Suggest to parents they might encourage children to take partContinue reading “L R EE R3”

L R EE R2

Let children handle books and draw their attention to pictures. Tell and read stories, looking at and interacting with young babies, and using voice, intonation and gesture to prompt babies’ interactions. Draw on children’s home cultures to create meaningful reading experiences. Make family stories using small photo albums or story apps with photos of familyContinue reading “L R EE R2”

L R EE R1

Provide mobiles, inviting displays and pictures of familiar characters in the environment, including in physical care areas, to prompt babies’ focused gaze, pointing and shared attention. Collect a diverse range of board books, cloth books, picture books and stories to share with young babies. Offer books that provide sensory experiences. Include babies in telephone andContinue reading “L R EE R1”

L R PR R6

Read aloud to children every day, introducing children to a wide variety of literature, and talking about the print and digital books you share. Encourage children to tell their own stories in their own way, to take the lead in storytelling so you can listen and learn from children about what they know and areContinue reading “L R PR R6”

L R PR R5

Discuss with children the characters and events in books being read to them. Encourage children to predict outcomes, to think of alternative endings and to compare story plots and the feelings of characters with their own experiences. Focus on meaningful print (such as a child’s name, words on a cereal packet or a book title,Continue reading “L R PR R5”

L R PR R4

Encourage children to use and extend the stories they hear in their play, using props and dressing up clothes as they relive and reinvent stories. Tune into words from stories that individual children particularly enjoy, e.g. children’s favourite words and words that are emotionally important to them. Revisit these words in meaningful interactions. Read storiesContinue reading “L R PR R4”

L R PR R3

Encourage and support children’s responses to picture books and stories you read with them. Use different voices to tell stories and encourage young children to join in wherever possible.

L R PR R2

Notice and support babies’ developing responses, gestures and movements as they learn to anticipate and join in with finger and word play. Make voice sounds and say words as babies explore print and digital books with adults –  leave pauses after words and sounds to encourage babies to begin to repeat them if they chooseContinue reading “L R PR R2”

L R PR R1

Use finger play, rhymes and familiar songs to support young babies’ enjoyment. Provide enjoyable shared experiences with books and apps in ways that are emotionally secure and supportive. Plan shared story and book time as a key source of nurture and attachment which will continue throughout the EYFS and beyond

L R UC R6

Enjoys an increasing range of print and digital books, both fiction and non-fiction Uses vocabulary and forms of speech that are increasingly influenced by their experiences of reading Describes main story settings, events and principal characters in increasing detail Re-enacts and reinvents stories they have heard in their play Knows that information can be retrievedContinue reading “L R UC R6”

L R UC R5

Listens to and joins in with stories and poems, when reading one-to-one and in small groups Joins in with repeated refrains and anticipates key events and phrases in rhymes and stories Begins to be aware of the way stories are structured, and to tell own stories Talks about events and principal characters in stories andContinue reading “L R UC R5”

L R UC R4

Has some favourite stories, rhymes, songs, poems or jingles Repeats and uses actions, words or phrases from familiar stories Fills in the missing word or phrase in a known rhyme, story or game, e.g. “Humpty Dumpty sat on a …” Begins to recognise familiar logos from children’s popular culture, commercial print or icons for appsContinue reading “L R UC R4”

L R UC R2

Handles books, printed and digital reading material with interest Responds to sounds in the environment such as cars, sirens and birds Is interested in and explores the sounds made by banging and tapping familiar objects and simple instruments Waves and taps arms, bounces or stamps to simple rhythms in songs and rhymes Notices pictures andContinue reading “L R UC R2”

L R UC R1

Notices and engages with sounds and images in the environment As part of sensory exploration, may touch and handle books and digital reading devices Enjoys looking at books and other suitable printed or digital material with familiar people, and being read to