L W PR R3

Encourage different mark-making movements – big, small, hard, soft, quick and slow, and different shapes, circles, lines and dots. Tell children about the marks you are making and encourage them to talk to you about theirs. Value these early mark making activities by sharing them with others including parents and carers. Write down (scribe) children’sContinue reading “L W PR R3”

L W PR R1 R2

Encourage children to use their fingers and implements to explore and trace marks on a surface, e.g. using a spoon in their food, or a finger in the sand. Make marks together with babies and toddlers using a range of appropriate materials and tools.

L W UC R6

Enjoys creating texts to communicate meaning for an increasingly wide range of  purposes, such as making greetings cards, tickets, lists, invitations and creating their own stories and books with images and sometimes with words, in print and digital formats Gives meaning to the marks they make as they draw, write, paint and type using aContinue reading “L W UC R6”

L W UC R5

Makes up stories, play scenarios, and drawings in response to experiences, such as  outings Sometimes gives meaning to their drawings and paintings Ascribes meanings to signs, symbols and words that they see in different places, including those they make themselves Includes mark making and early writing in their play Imitates adults’ writing by making continuousContinue reading “L W UC R5”

L W UC R4

Distinguishes between the different marks they make Enjoys drawing and writing on paper, on screen and on different textures, such as in sand or playdough and through using touch-screen technology.

L W UC R3

As toddlers develop, they increase their understanding of how their marks are symbolic and convey meaning. Their marks may not yet resemble letters and words but nonetheless may carry meaning for the child.  Begins to understand the cause and effect of their actions in mark making Knows that the marks they make are of valueContinue reading “L W UC R3”

L W UC R1 R2

Writing systems are complicated ways to symbolise meaning, and children need to learn many skills and develop a lot of knowledge as they begin to write.  Writing skills and understanding start to develop in babies and toddlers.   Firstly, children begin to understand that written texts are symbolic and carry meaning. Later they begin to produceContinue reading “L W UC R1 R2”

L R EE R6

Provide a rich range of quality children’s literature and dialogic shared reading experiences to involve children in critical engagement with narratives, characters and plots. Provide a range of everyday signs and written texts in play areas (labels, lists, recipes, instructions, etc.) so children can include these in their play. Make story books with children inContinue reading “L R EE R6”

L R EE R5

Provide some simple poetry, song, fiction and non-fiction books, both paper copies and digital. Provide fact and fiction books and possibly ebooks that children can access independently in all areas, e.g. construction area as well as the book area. Provide books containing photographs that children can share with adults, peers and read on their own.Continue reading “L R EE R5”

L R EE R4

Find quality time every day to tell and read stories to children, using puppets, soft toys, or real objects as props. Provide stories, pictures and puppets which allow children to experience and talk about how characters feel. Include familiar environmental print in the role play area. Create frequent opportunities for singing, rhymes and music sessions.Continue reading “L R EE R4”

L R EE R3

Provide digital recordings  of rhymes, stories, sounds and spoken words. Provide picture books, books with flaps or hidden words, and books with accompanying story apps. Provide story sacks for children to take home, for parents to read books with their children and talk about stories. Suggest to parents they might encourage children to take partContinue reading “L R EE R3”

L R EE R2

Let children handle books and draw their attention to pictures. Tell and read stories, looking at and interacting with young babies, and using voice, intonation and gesture to prompt babies’ interactions. Draw on children’s home cultures to create meaningful reading experiences. Make family stories using small photo albums or story apps with photos of familyContinue reading “L R EE R2”

L R EE R1

Provide mobiles, inviting displays and pictures of familiar characters in the environment, including in physical care areas, to prompt babies’ focused gaze, pointing and shared attention. Collect a diverse range of board books, cloth books, picture books and stories to share with young babies. Offer books that provide sensory experiences. Include babies in telephone andContinue reading “L R EE R1”

L R PR R6

Read aloud to children every day, introducing children to a wide variety of literature, and talking about the print and digital books you share. Encourage children to tell their own stories in their own way, to take the lead in storytelling so you can listen and learn from children about what they know and areContinue reading “L R PR R6”

L R PR R5

Discuss with children the characters and events in books being read to them. Encourage children to predict outcomes, to think of alternative endings and to compare story plots and the feelings of characters with their own experiences. Focus on meaningful print (such as a child’s name, words on a cereal packet or a book title,Continue reading “L R PR R5”

L R PR R4

Encourage children to use and extend the stories they hear in their play, using props and dressing up clothes as they relive and reinvent stories. Tune into words from stories that individual children particularly enjoy, e.g. children’s favourite words and words that are emotionally important to them. Revisit these words in meaningful interactions. Read storiesContinue reading “L R PR R4”

L R PR R3

Encourage and support children’s responses to picture books and stories you read with them. Use different voices to tell stories and encourage young children to join in wherever possible.

L R PR R2

Notice and support babies’ developing responses, gestures and movements as they learn to anticipate and join in with finger and word play. Make voice sounds and say words as babies explore print and digital books with adults –  leave pauses after words and sounds to encourage babies to begin to repeat them if they chooseContinue reading “L R PR R2”

L R PR R1

Use finger play, rhymes and familiar songs to support young babies’ enjoyment. Provide enjoyable shared experiences with books and apps in ways that are emotionally secure and supportive. Plan shared story and book time as a key source of nurture and attachment which will continue throughout the EYFS and beyond

L R UC R6

Enjoys an increasing range of print and digital books, both fiction and non-fiction Uses vocabulary and forms of speech that are increasingly influenced by their experiences of reading Describes main story settings, events and principal characters in increasing detail Re-enacts and reinvents stories they have heard in their play Knows that information can be retrievedContinue reading “L R UC R6”

L R UC R5

Listens to and joins in with stories and poems, when reading one-to-one and in small groups Joins in with repeated refrains and anticipates key events and phrases in rhymes and stories Begins to be aware of the way stories are structured, and to tell own stories Talks about events and principal characters in stories andContinue reading “L R UC R5”

L R UC R4

Has some favourite stories, rhymes, songs, poems or jingles Repeats and uses actions, words or phrases from familiar stories Fills in the missing word or phrase in a known rhyme, story or game, e.g. “Humpty Dumpty sat on a …” Begins to recognise familiar logos from children’s popular culture, commercial print or icons for appsContinue reading “L R UC R4”

L R UC R2

Handles books, printed and digital reading material with interest Responds to sounds in the environment such as cars, sirens and birds Is interested in and explores the sounds made by banging and tapping familiar objects and simple instruments Waves and taps arms, bounces or stamps to simple rhythms in songs and rhymes Notices pictures andContinue reading “L R UC R2”

L R UC R1

Notices and engages with sounds and images in the environment As part of sensory exploration, may touch and handle books and digital reading devices Enjoys looking at books and other suitable printed or digital material with familiar people, and being read to

PD HS EE R6

Plan opportunities, particularly after exercise, for children to talk about how their bodies feel. Review enabling environments for adventure and challenge, identifying areas where children are encouraged to take physical risks. Develop and make use of a variety of natural landscapes including slopes, woodland and natural dens in the undergrowth. Provide outdoor resources which complementContinue reading “PD HS EE R6”

PD HS EE R4

Allow children to pour their own drinks, serve their own food, choose a story, hold a puppet or water a plant. Provide support and advice for parents on healthy eating, oral hygiene and sleep expectations for their children Offer choices for children in terms of potties, trainer seats or steps. Create opportunities for moving towardsContinue reading “PD HS EE R4”

PD HS EE R3

Set up places, outdoors as well as indoors, for toddlers to take naps during the day: daytime sleep can be much more refreshing and successful when provided outside. Ensure that there are plenty of different places and ways, indoors and outdoors, that toddlers can find withdrawal, softness and calm in the moment that they needContinue reading “PD HS EE R3”

PD HS EE R2

Provide a comfortable, accessible place where babies can rest or sleep when they want to. Continue to provide supported sleeping, resting and withdrawal opportunities outdoors as well as inside, to best fit the conditions that individual babies need. Plan alternative activities for babies who do not need sleep at the same time as others do.Continue reading “PD HS EE R2”

PD HS EE R1

Provide a dedicated place for daytime sleeping outdoors as well as indoors to suit the needs of individual babies. Enable and allow babies to sleep when they need to and to wake up from naps naturally. Provide ample seating both indoors and outside so that adults can sit comfortably with distressed, resting and alert babies. Continue reading “PD HS EE R1”

PD HS PR R6

Be aware that some children may have sensory issues around food texture, taste, smell, or colour. Talk with parents and monitor. Find out what steps might be appropriate to build the child’s confidence and broaden their food repertoire, supporting their sensory integration. Acknowledge and encourage children’s efforts to manage their personal needs, and to useContinue reading “PD HS PR R6”

PD HS PR R5

Talk with children about why you encourage them to rest when they are tired or why they need to wear wellingtons when it is muddy outdoors. Encourage children to notice the changes in their bodies after exercise, such as their heart beating faster. Talk with children about the importance of hand-washing and infection control. HelpContinue reading “PD HS PR R5”

PD HS PR R4

Provide quiet spaces for children to rest or nap and regular access to the outdoors or other spaces where children can be energetic Respond to how child communicates need for food, drinks, toileting and when uncomfortable. Support parents’ routines with young children’s self-care including toileting by having flexible routines and by encouraging children’s efforts atContinue reading “PD HS PR R4”

PD HS PR R3

Be ready to provide the kind of recovery method that each child needs, or to support the child in managing recovery for themselves. Continue discussions with parents about the critical nature of sufficient sleep and how to provide daytime naps. Be responsive to and encourage each child’s drive to become independent in self-care situations. BeContinue reading “PD HS PR R3”

PD HS PR R2

Find out from parents how their baby communicates needs. Ensure that parents and carers who speak languages other than English are able to share their views. Be ready to support babies when they experience changes in exploration energy and suddenly need adult attention: this response enables the physiological basis for later self-regulation. Use feeding, changingContinue reading “PD HS PR R2”

PD HS UC R6

Eats a healthy range of foodstuffs and understands need for variety in food Describes a range of different food textures and tastes when cooking and notices changes when they are combined or exposed to hot and cold temperatures Describes physical changes to the body that can occur when feeling unwell, anxious, tired, angry or sadContinue reading “PD HS UC R6”

PD HS UC R3

Sleeps for 12-14 hours a day with one/two naps  Daytime sleeping continues to be important for healthy development Highly active in short bursts, with frequent and sudden need for rest or withdrawal Enjoys hugs and cuddles and seeks comfort from attachment figure when they feel the need Uses physical expression of feelings to release stress.Continue reading “PD HS UC R3”

PD HS UC R2

Sleeps for 11-15 hours a day with at least 2 naps Self-soothes and is able to drop off to sleep when conditions are right for them Expresses feelings and communicates through gesture, facial expression, movements, body language and vocalisations (such as joy, distress, frustration and fear) Shows rapid changes in energy levels, from highly activeContinue reading “PD HS UC R2”

PD HS UC R1

Responds to and thrives on warm, sensitive physical contact and care Makes needs known through crying and body movements Responds to being rocked as a means of soothing Sleeps for 14-16 hours a day, with several short naps. Substantial sleeping is vital for processing sensory information taken in while awake Responds and turns to sounds,Continue reading “PD HS UC R1”

PD MH EE R5 R6

Provide time and space to enjoy energetic play outdoors daily. Provide large portable equipment that children can move about safely and cooperatively to create their own structures, such as milk crates, tyres, large cardboard tubes. Practise movement skills through games with beanbags, cones, balls and hoops. Plan activities where children can practise moving in differentContinue reading “PD MH EE R5 R6”

PD MH EE R4

Plan opportunities for children to tackle a range of levels and surfaces including flat and hilly ground, grass, pebbles, asphalt, smooth floors and carpets. Provide a range of large play equipment that can be used in different ways, such as boxes, ladders, A-frames and barrels. Plan time for children to experiment with equipment and toContinue reading “PD MH EE R4”

PD MH EE R3

Anticipate young children’s exuberance and ensure the space is clear and suitable for their rapid and sometimes unpredictable movements. Provide opportunities to swing, spin and bounce. Provide different arrangements of toys and soft play materials to encourage crawling, tumbling, rolling and climbing. Use music to stimulate exploration with rhythmic movements. Ensure that toddlers spend lotsContinue reading “PD MH EE R3”

PD MH EE R2

Alongside the continuing role of adult bodies, the floor is the best enabling environment for babies at this stage. Limit the time older babies spend in seats, highchairs, bouncers and other “containers” as this prevents the critical physical development that takes place through crawling. Plan space to encourage free movement, while being kept safe byContinue reading “PD MH EE R2”

PD MH EE R1

The caregiver’s body is the first and foremost enabling environment, and babies need lots of time in contact with attentive and responsive adults. From birth onwards, babies need to experience movement in space through being held.  Rocking, side-to-side and up-and-down movements are soothing, enjoyable and very developmentally beneficial. Provide comfortable seating both indoors and outdoors,Continue reading “PD MH EE R1”

PD MH PR R3

Enable toddlers to have at least three hours a day moving and being active, both indoors and outdoors, across the day and according to the child’s interest. Develop a shared team culture of managing risk positively so as to enable toddlers to explore and stretch their abilities. Continue to provide a visible, attentive “safe base”Continue reading “PD MH PR R3”

PD MH PR R2

Enable older babies to have at least three hours a day moving and being active, taken in short periods, across the day and according to the child’s interest. Develop a shared approach to managing risk that enables babies to explore and develop their abilities. Ensure that clothing supports babies’ mobility for crawling and is notContinue reading “PD MH PR R2”

PD MH PR R1

Ensure that from birth onwards babies have frequent opportunities for moving and being active throughout the time that they are awake. Take babies outdoors as much as possible, paying attention to their responses to sensory stimulations such as smells, changing light and moving air. Give babies lots of time being touched and held, moving aroundContinue reading “PD MH PR R1”

PD MH UC R6

Chooses to move in a range of ways, moving freely and with confidence making changes to body shape, position and pace of movement such as slithering, shuffling, rolling, crawling, walking, running, jumping, skipping, sliding and hopping Experiments with different ways of moving, testing out ideas and adapting movements to reduce risk Jumps off an objectContinue reading “PD MH UC R6”

PD MH UC R5

Climbs stairs, steps and moves across climbing equipment using alternate feet. Maintains balance using hands and body to stabilise Walks down steps or slopes whilst carrying a small object, maintaining balance and stability Runs with spatial awareness and negotiates space successfully, adjusting speed or direction to avoid obstacles Can balance on one foot or inContinue reading “PD MH UC R5”

PD MH UC R3

Develops security in walking upright using feet alternately and can also run short distances Walks upstairs facing forwards holding rail or hand of adult, with both feet onto a single step at a time Changes position from standing to squatting and sitting with little effort Participates in finger and action rhymes, songs and games, imitatingContinue reading “PD MH UC R3”

PD MH UC R2

Belly crawling moves into crawling up on hands and knees Becomes adept at changing position from crawling to sitting in order to stop, pick up, handle and investigate objects Sits unsupported on the floor, leaving hands free to manipulate objects with both hands Picks up objects in palmar grip and shakes, waves, bangs, pulls andContinue reading “PD MH UC R2”

PD MH UC R1

Gradually develops ability to hold up own head Makes movements with arms and legs which gradually become more controlled – moves hands together/legs together Follows and tracks a sound or moving object, moving head and eyes When lying on back, plays with hands and grasps feet, alternating mouthing hands/feet with focusing gaze on them, andContinue reading “PD MH UC R1”

CL S EE R6

Give time and make spaces  for children to initiate discussions from shared experiences and have conversations with peers and adults. Give thinking time for children to decide what they want to say and how they will say it. Encourage language play, e.g. through stories such as Goldilocks and the Three Bears and action songs thatContinue reading “CL S EE R6”

CL S EE R4 R5

Display pictures and photographs showing engaging, familiar or fantastical events, objects and activities and talk about them with the children. Provide activities which help children to learn to distinguish differences in sounds, word patterns and rhythms. Plan to encourage correct use of language by telling repetitive stories, and playing games which involve repetition of wordsContinue reading “CL S EE R4 R5”

CL S EE R3

Allow time to follow young children’s lead and have fun together while developing vocabulary, e.g. saying We’re jumping up, going down. Where appropriate make opportunities to talk through and comment on some activities to highlight specific vocabulary or language structures, e.g. You’ve caught the ball. I’ve caught the ball. Eva’s caught the ball. Provide storiesContinue reading “CL S EE R3”

CL S EE R2

Find out from parents the words that children use for things which are important to them, such as bankie for their comfort blanket, remembering to extend this question to home languages. Explain that strong foundations in a home language support the development of English. Tune into what different children enjoy and create environments where babblingContinue reading “CL S EE R2”

CL S EE R1

Learn and use key words in the home languages of babies in the setting. Value and learn from families about their communities, languages and cultures.  Including influences from other contexts of the baby’s life supports wellbeing. Encourage parents to record familiar, comforting sounds, such as lullabies in home languages. Use these to help babies settleContinue reading “CL S EE R1”

CL S PR R6

Support children’s growing ability to express a wide range of feelings orally, and talk about their own experiences. Introduce and repeat new words in a range of contexts and encourage children to use them in their own talk Encourage conversation with others and demonstrate appropriate conventions: turn-taking, waiting until someone else has finished, listening toContinue reading “CL S PR R6”

CL S PR R3

Build vocabulary by giving choices, e.g. apple or satsuma? Model building sentences by repeating what the child says and adding another word, e.g. child says car, say mummy’s car or blue car. Give the child enough time to talk with silences to allow the child to respond or pauses to indicate turn talking. Show childrenContinue reading “CL S PR R3”

CL S PR R2

Try to “tune in” to the different messages young babies are attempting to convey, and respond. Look out for patterns of communications they use to invite you into encounters.  This might include being playful or physical movements and utterances. Bringing you toys, or holding out objects to you may indicate that they want to “talk”.Continue reading “CL S PR R2”

CL S PR R1

Find out from parents how they like to communicate with their baby, noting especially the chosen language. Ensure parents understand the importance of talking with babies in their home language. Pay attention to babies’ communications including facial expression, gesture, etc., and respond promptly so they know they have been heard. Encourage babies’ sounds and babblingContinue reading “CL S PR R1”

CL S UC R6

Extends vocabulary, especially by grouping and naming, exploring the meaning and sounds of new words Uses language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences in play situations Links statements and sticks to a main theme or intention Uses talk to organise, sequence and clarify thinking, ideas, feelings and events Introduces a storyline or narrative intoContinue reading “CL S UC R6”

CL S UC R5

Beginning to use more complex sentences to link thoughts (e.g. using and, because) Able to use language in recalling past experiences Can retell a simple past event in correct order (e.g. went down slide, hurt finger) Uses talk to explain what is happening and anticipate what might happen next Questions why things happen and givesContinue reading “CL S UC R5”

CL S UC R4

Uses language to share feelings, experiences and thoughts Holds a conversation, jumping from topic to topic Learns new words very rapidly and is able to use them in communicating Uses a variety of questions (e.g. what, where, who) Uses longer sentences (e.g. Mummy gonna work) Beginning to use word endings (e.g. going, cats)

CL S UC R3

Copies familiar expressions, e.g. Oh dear, All gone’ Uses different types of everyday words (nouns, verbs and adjectives, e.g. banana, go, sleep, hot) Beginning to put two words together (e.g. Want ball, More juice)  Beginning to ask simple questions Beginning to talk about people and things that are not present Uses gestures, sometimes with limitedContinue reading “CL S UC R3”

CL S UC R2

Uses sounds in play, e.g. brrrm for toy car Uses single words Frequently imitates words and sounds Enjoys babbling and increasingly experiments with using sounds Uses words to communicate for a range of purposes (e.g. teddy, more, no, bye-bye) Uses pointing with eye gaze, and then fingers or hands, to make requests and to shareContinue reading “CL S UC R2”

CL S UC R1

Communicates needs and feelings in a variety of ways including crying, gurgling, babbling and squealing Makes own sounds in response when talked to by familiar adults Lifts arms in anticipation of being picked up Practises and gradually develops speech sounds (babbling) to communicate with adults; says sounds like baba, nono, gogo Points and looks toContinue reading “CL S UC R1”

CL U EE R5 R6

Set up shared experiences that children can reflect upon, e.g. visits, cooking, or stories that can be re-enacted. Help children to predict and order events coherently, by providing props and materials that encourage children to re-enact, using talk and action Find out from parents how children make themselves understood at home; confirm which their preferredContinue reading “CL U EE R5 R6”

CL U EE R4

Include things which excite young children’s curiosity, such as hats, bubbles, shells, story books, seeds and snails, which reflect their wider living and non-living communities. Provide activities, such as cooking, where talk is used to anticipate or initiate what children will be doing, e.g. We need some eggs. Let’s see if we can find someContinue reading “CL U EE R4”

CL U EE R3

Plan play activities and provide resources which encourage young children to engage in symbolic play, e.g. putting a “baby” to bed and talking to it appropriately. Plan real world shared experiences such as visits, everyday tasks, or preparing activities in the setting. Use pictures, books, real objects, and signs alongside your words.

CL U PR R6

Ask children to think in advance and predict how they will accomplish a task. Talk through and sequence the stages together. Enjoy sharing stories with individual children and small groups.  Engage in sustained shared thinking with them  to extend their thinking and use of vocabulary. Use appropriate vocabulary during play with children to encourage themContinue reading “CL U PR R6”

CL U UC R6

Understands a range of complex sentence structures including negatives, plurals and tense markers Beginning to understand humour, e.g. nonsense rhymes, jokes Able to follow a story without pictures or props Listens and responds to ideas expressed by others in conversation or discussion Understands questions such as who; why; when; where and how

CL U UC R4

Identifies action words by following simple instructions, e.g. Show me jumping Beginning to understand more complex sentences, e.g. Put your toys away and then sit on the carpet Understands who, what, where in simple questions (e.g. Who’s that? Who can? What’s that? Where is?) Developing understanding of simple concepts (e.g. fast/slow, good/bad)

CL U UC R3

Understands different  situations – able to follow routine events and activities using nonverbal cues Selects familiar objects by name and will go and find objects when asked, or identify objects from a group Understands simple sentences (e.g. Throw the ball)

CL U UC R2

Is developing the ability to follow others’ body language, including pointing and gesture Responds to simple questions when in a familiar context with a special person (e.g. Where’s Mummy?, Where’s your nose?) Understanding of single words in context is developing, e.g. cup, milk, daddy